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   CNN
The number of times tobacco use appeared on-screen in PG-13 films jumped 120% between 2010 and 2018, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. The findings come as skyrocketing e-cigarette use erased previous years' progress in ending youth dependence on tobacco.
   PhillyVoice
Despite a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in movies and initiation, smoking in film is steadily increasing...
   US News & World Report
The new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that while the share of top movies that showed tobacco product use remained level in recent years, there was a 57% increase in "tobacco incidents" in those films, driven largely by a 120% spike in PG-13 movies.
   US News & World Report
Trends like these are important, Tynan and colleagues said, because "the Surgeon General has concluded that there is a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in movies and initiation of smoking among young persons."
   Daily Beast
The CDC says that while the percentage of films that show or imply tobacco use has been stable since 2010, the number of “tobacco incidents” in top-grossing movies is up 57 percent overall and 120 percent in PG-13 movies, especially biographical dramas.
   Sacramento Bee
“This new study should put to rest any notion that motion picture tax incentives may work in some states but not others,” said lead study author Michael Thom, a USC associate professor. “The states investing the most in incentives are not getting the return on investment taxpayers deserve, pure and simple. These incentives cost taxpayers billions of dollars, at a time when that money could be directed to other much needed public services.”
   PNC News First
Attorney General Leevin Camacho said that after the master settlement agreement with tobacco, they realized that the reason a lot of young people are smoking is because they imitate what they see in movies and TV.
   NPR
...Rosenberg says it's perhaps disingenuous for filmmakers or studios to argue, as Netflix does today, that smoking onscreen is an artistic expression when much of it, historically, came out of marketing departments — product placement ... Glantz worries that kind of product placement might happen again with weed, once it becomes widely commercialized.
   State Journal-Register
“As the attorneys general emphasize, the ongoing and even increasing appearance of smoking and tobacco use and related imagery in countless movies and shows that are streamed is a disaster for our youth,” said Cliff Douglas, vice president of tobacco control for the American Cancer Society. “One wonders what the industry is thinking, if anything, when they continue to put this damaging stuff out there; when they have complete discretion to be more thoughtful about protecting our children when pursuing their creativity.”
   NAAG
The National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) sent letters to leading U.S. streaming services, encouraging the industry to adopt business practices that protect young viewers from tobacco imagery in video content. Letters were sent to Amazon.com, Apple, AT&T, CBS Corporation, Comcast Corporation, Discovery, The Walt Disney Company, Google, Netflix, Sony, Lionsgate, Viacom, and Walmart.
   Associated Press
Forty-three of the nation’s attorneys general are asking the streaming industry to limit depictions of tobacco use in their videos.
   CA Dept of Justice
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson today led a bipartisan coalition of 43 attorneys general in urging the streaming industry to limit tobacco use in their video content. Due to the growing use of tobacco products amongst teens, the attorneys general urge the streaming industry to take proactive steps to protect the lives of young viewers.
   Times of India
A Telugu-language film's poster shows the star smoking. Karnataka's state tobacco control office has cited this violation of national rules and plans a "sensitization" program for local film producers and exhibitors in lieu of penalties. The state's capital is Bengaluru (Bangalore), India's high-tech hub.
   CBC Toronto
Robert Schwartz is the director of the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit and one of the authors of a study that estimates 185,000 people aged 17 or younger [in Ontario] will become smokers because of seeing people smoke on-screen. [6-minute audio segment]
   Science Daily
More than half of the top-grossing movies in Ontario in the past 16 years featured smoking, according to University of Toronto researchers with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit -- and most of these films were rated as acceptable for youth.
   AAFP News
For the second year in a row, Netflix, the most commonly watched streaming service among those ages 15-24, topped the list — nearly tripling its number of tobacco incidents (866) compared with the previous year's report (299).
   Variety
News that “Gears 5” is stubbing out smoking comes after Netflix last week said it will cut out tobacco imagery in its originals rated for younger viewers, with the exception of maintaining “historical or factual accuracy.” That came after Truth released a report finding that tobacco use in TV series popular among those aged 15-24 had surged in the past year — and that Netflix original series “Stranger Things” and “Orange Is the New Black” among the worst offenders for showing smoking.
   Forbes
Smoking imagery appears to be common place on streaming services, part of the artistic license that some associate with depictions of cool, aloof, stressed or compulsive personality traits. But the data regarding the impact of tobacco imagery in films and television on adolescent and young adult behavior speaks volumes. The bottom line—young people exposed to smoking and tobacco imagery via film and television are more likely to start using tobacco.
   indiewire.com
Smoking may be “banned,” but it’s hardly gone. Here’s how each studio explains their own policy.
   Vulture
Of course, one could argue it is factually accurate to depict adults living in a small Indiana town in the early 1980s as smoking like chimneys, but then you remember there’s an interdimensional Demogorgon in this show and we’re not exactly talking about a historical biopic here.
   NPR
Netflix said future shows aimed at its younger audiences will not depict smoking or e-cigarette use unless it is "essential." The streaming content giant also says information about smoking will be included as part of its ratings.
   Variety
Netflix said that going forward, all new shows it commissions with ratings of TV-14 or below (and all films rated PG-13 or below) will exclude smoking and e-cigarette use, except for “reasons of historical or factual accuracy.” The streamer also said new projects with higher ratings will not depict smoking or e-cigarette use “unless it’s essential to the creative vision of the artist or because it’s character-defining (historically or culturally important).”
   Yahoo Finance
The report is released as millions of teens prepare to watch the season three premiere of "Stranger Things," which, for the second year in a row, is the worst offender. The show had a 44% increase in smoking from season one (182) to season two (262) and in its first two seasons, tobacco was depicted in every episode.
   USA Today
“I’m hopeful a second year of our report showing a situation that's getting worse, not better, will have influence,” Truth Initiative President and CEO Robin Koval says. Koval wants to see programmers, "particularly those in streaming media," enact strong anti-tobacco policies. One existing example is a policy at Disney's film division, which forbids smoking scenes in films rated G, PG or PG-13, except in the case of historical figures or if the activity emphasizes the negative consequences.
   Cinema Blend

The depiction of smoking in American films has changed drastically in recent years. While there are classic for all ages filled with characters lighting up a cigarette or cigar, pressures extending from public heath concerns and accusations of glamorizing the practice have forced Hollywood to change its ways in the last decade. This was primarily accomplished through the actions of the MPAA, which started to take smoking into consideration when rating movies in 2007.

   China Daily
Xu Guihua, a senior adviser to the association and former deputy director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, said that, as in the past, no director or producer came to claim their awards on Friday. But she believes such publicity will remind the film and television industry to take responsibility and reduce tobacco footage in their works...The average number of tobacco-related scenes for a film last year was 12.3, a decline of nearly 50 percent compared with 2007, she said.
   Business Standard
As a filmmaker, I have pledged that from now onwards any actor will not smoke in my films. In my films, actors don't smoke usually, but in 'Om Shanti Om', the character played by Arjun Rampal smoked a cigarette...and we all know what happened with him in the end of the film...I have made a promise that I will never glorify smoking.
   Korea Times
As part of efforts to curb smoking by young people, the ministry will ban tobacco producers from using cartoon characters in their ads, while mandating anti-smoking ads in the introduction of dramas and movies containing smoking scenes.
   The Chronicle
In a Chronicle poll of 248 respondents, 80 students said they have used nicotine during their high school careers … “Smoking in movies always looks glamorous, but that’s just not what smoking is like in real life,” Amy Kronenberg [Harvard-Westlake School] ’20 said. “[Smoking] is gross and hardly ever looks cool. Just knowing what [smoking] does to your lungs removes all of the glamour.” [The Chronicle is the online student newspaper of Harvard-Westlake School, Los Angeles — Ed.]
   Truth Initiative
A coalition of eight national and international health organizations today urged The Walt Disney Company (Disney) to require its partner network, Vice, to terminate its relationship with Philip Morris International, the world’s largest manufacturer and seller of cigarettes.