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   CNBC
[R]esearcher Robert Marich said in an interview with CNBC's "American Greed." "It … depends on the stomach of the voters to essentially subsidize an industry and lower taxes for a certain select industry, which means essentially raising taxes for everyone else."
   Reader's Digest
That popular "three things are banned" rumor certainly doesn't hold up for some of Disney's major franchise properties.
   Thrive Global
…the e-cigarette industry knows that 50 years of proving smoking causes cancer means little to an 18-year-old who doesn’t know what Vietnam was. Not to mention that smoking in movies — a topic I worked on with Vice President Gore in the ’90s — has actually gotten worse since then.
   The New York Times
Tide Pod shout-outs onscreen. Flirtatious exchanges with companies on Twitter. Netflix may not run ads, but it has become a coveted marketing platform. [See Smokefree Movies' blog on cigarette brand display in Netflix' TV-14 "Stranger Things" fantasy series, at https://smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/blog/its-time-get-tobacco-brands-screen and our detailed September 2019 ad at https://smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/sfm-ads/ad-131. — Editor]
   Los Angeles Times
After admitting to chain-smoking, ['Joker' director Todd] Phillips noted that his nicotine habit paled in comparison to that of [Joaquin] Phoenix, who “smokes more than Humphrey Bogart.” “I used to Juul, and I had to stop Juul-ing before I directed because I knew I wouldn’t stop,” interjected [director Greta] Gerwig, referring to the vape device. “I knew I’d be talking to an actor and Juul-ing the whole time.”
   BU News Service
Despite the U.S. Surgeon General’s conclusion that there is a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in movies and the initiation of smoking among young persons, on-screen smoking in movies is still increasing.
   WLNS-TV Lansing
One of the CDC recommendations is giving movies with tobacco incidents an R rating to eliminate tobacco product imagery from youth-rated films.
   Daily Mail
China has vowed to clamp down on films and TV series that have 'too many' smoking scenes in a bid to keep its youngsters away from cigarettes. The country's central government has ordered its entertainment censors to increase its screening efforts on productions that show their characters puffing away. SFM note: The Nov. 7. 2019, policy interpretation breaks no new ground in discouraging on-screen smoking. What's new is that it positions smokefree media as part of China's major multi-sectoral, teen-centered tobacco control initiative. For an initial translation, see: http://bit.ly/chinapolicy-110719
   MinnPost
This is a hugely discouraging finding. As the CDC researchers point out, research has shown that the more often young people are exposed to onscreen images of smoking, the greater the likelihood they will take up smoking themselves.
   CNN
The number of times tobacco use appeared on-screen in PG-13 films jumped 120% between 2010 and 2018, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. The findings come as skyrocketing e-cigarette use erased previous years' progress in ending youth dependence on tobacco.
   PhillyVoice
Despite a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in movies and initiation, smoking in film is steadily increasing...
   NBC News
A new government study reveals tobacco use in PG-13 movies has increased 120% over the past decade. The large majority of those scenes were in biographical dramas, but most characters who actually used tobacco were fictional. The Surgeon General has said watching smoking in movies may lead youth to begin smoking themselves.
   US News & World Report
The new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that while the share of top movies that showed tobacco product use remained level in recent years, there was a 57% increase in "tobacco incidents" in those films, driven largely by a 120% spike in PG-13 movies.
   US News & World Report
Trends like these are important, Tynan and colleagues said, because "the Surgeon General has concluded that there is a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in movies and initiation of smoking among young persons."
   Daily Beast
The CDC says that while the percentage of films that show or imply tobacco use has been stable since 2010, the number of “tobacco incidents” in top-grossing movies is up 57 percent overall and 120 percent in PG-13 movies, especially biographical dramas.
   Sacramento Bee
“This new study should put to rest any notion that motion picture tax incentives may work in some states but not others,” said lead study author Michael Thom, a USC associate professor. “The states investing the most in incentives are not getting the return on investment taxpayers deserve, pure and simple. These incentives cost taxpayers billions of dollars, at a time when that money could be directed to other much needed public services.”
   PNC News First
Attorney General Leevin Camacho said that after the master settlement agreement with tobacco, they realized that the reason a lot of young people are smoking is because they imitate what they see in movies and TV.
   NPR
...Rosenberg says it's perhaps disingenuous for filmmakers or studios to argue, as Netflix does today, that smoking onscreen is an artistic expression when much of it, historically, came out of marketing departments — product placement ... Glantz worries that kind of product placement might happen again with weed, once it becomes widely commercialized.
   State Journal-Register
“As the attorneys general emphasize, the ongoing and even increasing appearance of smoking and tobacco use and related imagery in countless movies and shows that are streamed is a disaster for our youth,” said Cliff Douglas, vice president of tobacco control for the American Cancer Society. “One wonders what the industry is thinking, if anything, when they continue to put this damaging stuff out there; when they have complete discretion to be more thoughtful about protecting our children when pursuing their creativity.”
   NAAG
The National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) sent letters to leading U.S. streaming services, encouraging the industry to adopt business practices that protect young viewers from tobacco imagery in video content. Letters were sent to Amazon.com, Apple, AT&T, CBS Corporation, Comcast Corporation, Discovery, The Walt Disney Company, Google, Netflix, Sony, Lionsgate, Viacom, and Walmart.
   Associated Press
Forty-three of the nation’s attorneys general are asking the streaming industry to limit depictions of tobacco use in their videos.
   CA Dept of Justice
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson today led a bipartisan coalition of 43 attorneys general in urging the streaming industry to limit tobacco use in their video content. Due to the growing use of tobacco products amongst teens, the attorneys general urge the streaming industry to take proactive steps to protect the lives of young viewers.
   Times of India
A Telugu-language film's poster shows the star smoking. Karnataka's state tobacco control office has cited this violation of national rules and plans a "sensitization" program for local film producers and exhibitors in lieu of penalties. The state's capital is Bengaluru (Bangalore), India's high-tech hub.
   CBC Toronto
Robert Schwartz is the director of the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit and one of the authors of a study that estimates 185,000 people aged 17 or younger [in Ontario] will become smokers because of seeing people smoke on-screen. [6-minute audio segment]
   Science Daily
More than half of the top-grossing movies in Ontario in the past 16 years featured smoking, according to University of Toronto researchers with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit -- and most of these films were rated as acceptable for youth.
   AAFP News
For the second year in a row, Netflix, the most commonly watched streaming service among those ages 15-24, topped the list — nearly tripling its number of tobacco incidents (866) compared with the previous year's report (299).
   Variety
News that “Gears 5” is stubbing out smoking comes after Netflix last week said it will cut out tobacco imagery in its originals rated for younger viewers, with the exception of maintaining “historical or factual accuracy.” That came after Truth released a report finding that tobacco use in TV series popular among those aged 15-24 had surged in the past year — and that Netflix original series “Stranger Things” and “Orange Is the New Black” among the worst offenders for showing smoking.
   Forbes
Smoking imagery appears to be common place on streaming services, part of the artistic license that some associate with depictions of cool, aloof, stressed or compulsive personality traits. But the data regarding the impact of tobacco imagery in films and television on adolescent and young adult behavior speaks volumes. The bottom line—young people exposed to smoking and tobacco imagery via film and television are more likely to start using tobacco.
   indiewire.com
Smoking may be “banned,” but it’s hardly gone. Here’s how each studio explains their own policy.
   Vulture
Of course, one could argue it is factually accurate to depict adults living in a small Indiana town in the early 1980s as smoking like chimneys, but then you remember there’s an interdimensional Demogorgon in this show and we’re not exactly talking about a historical biopic here.